Forgiveness

In this lesson, youth will discover that forgiveness is sourced in God and can be supported or suppressed by our community

Duration: 60 minutes

Enhancer of Joy

Forgiveness

Duration

60 minutes

Lesson Developed by

Paul Gorrell

Goal

A Path Toward Joy

Tips to Prepare

  • Read and meditate on Luke 5:17-26 well in advance of leading the group.
  • Search your own life to consider how you might offer and/or receive needed forgiveness.
  • Ask leaders to prayerfully consider what it would mean to create a community of forgiveness.

Materials Checklist

  • Bibles or printed copies of the scripture
  • Large sheets of paper or flipchart paper and markers (Activity 1)
  • Picture of the sculpture: Forgiveness by Eóin Burke (Activity 2)

Setting the Atmosphere

  • Create an upbeat playlist of music to welcome participants.
  • As participants arrive say, “It’s good to see you.”
  • Make sure the room is clean and that all seats are oriented toward one another so that participants and leaders can see and be seen

Scripture Focus

Luke 5:17-26

Purpose

During this session, participants and leaders will discover that forgiveness is sourced in God and can be supported or suppressed by our community. Also, through joining and sharing in God’s forgiveness participants will discover that the spreadability of joy is enhanced.

Objectives

Throughout this session, participants will engage scripture, view a piece of art that will facilitate discussion and dynamic activities, and be given opportunities for deep reflection and relationship-building.

Further Study

  • Free of Charge, by Miroslav Volf
  • Helping People Forgive, by David W. Augsburger
  • Resources at www.peacerighthere.org

Introduction for Leaders

Key Theological Aspects

In this session, based on Luke 5:17-26, the key theological focus is on the authority of God to forgive the sins of the person who is paralyzed. Jesus in this story shows that forgiveness, to be authoritative and powerful, must be sourced in the forgiveness of God. Theologian, Miroslav Volf writes, in his book Free of Charge:

Briefly, God is the God who forgives. We forgive because God forgives. We forgive as God forgives. We forgive by echoing God’s forgiveness. (Volf, 131)

Volf continues in another section of his book by weaving in the thoughts of theologian Martin Luther into his account of forgiveness:

Christ is not just outside us, modeling forgiveness and urging us to forgive. Christ lives in us and is himself, as Luther wrote, “the basis, the cause, the source of all our own actual righteousness.” From Christ we receive the power and the willingness to forgive. Christ forgives through us and that is why we can forgive. (Volf, 200)

Secondary theological aspects of this passage may incorporate the role of the friends who carried the person who is paralyzed and the wider community that surrounds this instance of forgiveness, healing, and joy. It may be worthwhile to consider the sequence of these three happenings (forgiveness, healing, joy). Upon the forgiveness of sins and healing of the person who is paralyzed we discover that not only is this person full of joy, but also that there is evidence of joy among all who witnessed the drama. In this story we see forgiveness and healing enhancing the spreadability of joy.

Teaching Points for Consideration

  • Who is authorized to forgive in this story and why is that important?
  • What is the role of friends who carried the person who is paralyzed?
  • What is the role of the wider community who surrounded Jesus?
  • What is the relationship between forgiveness and the joy that was experienced by the person who was paralyzed, the friends, and the wider community?

Gather

Gather (5 minutes)

  • Greetings

It’s good to see everyone. Today we will be thinking about one of the hardest parts of being in relationship with others. We will discuss something that offers a path to real experiences of joy when joy seems far away. Before we begin let’s pray together.

  • Pray Together

(a prayer of St Francis of Assisi, modified to be inclusive of a community with the words “us” and “let us bring”)

Lord, make us instruments of your peace; where there is hatred, let us bring love; where there is injury let us bring pardon; where there is discord let us bring union; where there is doubt let us bring faith; where there is despair let us bring hope; where there is darkness let us bring light; and where there is sadness let us bring joy.

  • Introduction 

As we go through a day, a week, a month, a year we face experiences of being hurt and hurting others. Sometimes wrongs are done to us and sometimes we are the one’s doing the wrong. We cannot reverse wrongs that are already suffered and we know what it means to sense the loss of a broken relationship. In situations where relationships have been broken, we often hold onto a hope that we might find our way on a path of forgiveness. Through forgiveness, sourced in God’s immeasurable and unstoppable love, we can come to profound experiences of joy with others, ourselves, the world around us, and God. Forgiveness truly is God’s way of mending the world.

Forgiveness can be difficult to understand, difficult to give, and difficult to receive. In this session we will surround ourselves with Scripture, art, important questions, mind-stretching ideas, and the time and space to hear from God and one another. With God and each other let’s find out what we can learn about forgiveness today.

Engage

Engage (20 minutes)

Activity 1: Scripture 
As a group, read aloud Luke 5:17-26. Make sure that each participant is
provided the text of the story (either printed out, digitally projected, or
through distributed Bibles). To engage this story choose either Option 1 or
Option 2 in order to answer the following questions.

  • What does Luke 5:17-26 tell us about forgiveness and what is God’s
    relationship to forgiveness in this story?
  • What role did the paralyzed person’s friends and the wider community
    play in him experiencing forgiveness and healing?
  • How and when does joy enter into this story and who experiences joy?

Option 1 | Brainstorm Walk-Around
Use 3 sheets of paper from the large self-stick easel pad and put them up
in 3 different parts of the room. On each sheet of paper write 1 of the
questions above. Count off the group of participants by 3’s and designate
each group to a station. Allow each group to have 2 minutes to answer the
question at each station. Instruct each group to record their responses with
a marker on the sheet of paper. When the time is up, rotate the groups to a
new station. This activity will get people moving and will activate
participants minds, hearts, and bodies.

Option 2 | Large Group Brainstorm
Use 3 sheets of paper from the large self-stick easel pad and post them so
that they are visible. On each sheet of paper write 1 of the questions
above. Select a writer for each question/paper and allow each of the 3
writers to take turns leading the Large Group Brainstorm by asking their
fellow participants for their answers.

Activity 2: Large Group Sculpture Activity 

  1. Show the picture of the sculpture: Forgiveness by Eóin Burke, and allow
    the participants to view the sculpture in silence for 3 minutes. The
    picture is attached to this lesson and also available at
    www.peacerighthere.org/champion-peace.
  2. Ask for a few volunteers to model the pose of the sculpture for the
    group.
  3. As the volunteers enter into the pose of the person in the sculpture ask
    the volunteers what this position feels like.
  4. Ask the large group, “Where is there stress in the pose and what might
    that mean?”
  5. Celebrate your volunteers who posed and all who participated in the
    activity.
  6. Continue this activity by asking the large group the questions below.
    For each question use a sheet of paper from the large self-stick easel
    pad.
  7. Allow participants to get up and write their answers on the paper(s).
    While 1 person is writing continue to field responses for the other
    questions. As questions are being answered make sure the image of
    the sculpture can be seen by the group.
  • As you look at this sculpture, what do you find yourself focusing on?
  • Do you have any questions, comments, ideas, or feelings while looking
    at this sculpture? If so, please describe them.
  • What does this sculpture seem to say about forgiveness?
  • What does the person represented in this sculpture need as it relates to
    forgiveness?
  • What connections can you make between this sculpture and the story
    in Luke 5:17-26?

Reflect

Reflect (30 minutes)

Activity 3: Human Clay Activity 
Divide the participants into small groups. Tell each small group to select
one participant to be the human clay and the other group members will be
the sculptors. Ask, “How would you as a group sculpt forgiveness?”
Instruct small groups to use spoken words and gestures (no touching) to
“sculpt” the human clay to demonstrate what forgiveness looks like to
them. For instance you can instruct your human clay to raise or lower their
arm, clench or release their hands, etc. When you are finished take a
photo to share with the larger group or have each group model their pose
and share why they sculpted the pose in such a way.

Activity 4: Small Groups 
In the same small groups invite participants to reflect on some of the
following questions. You may assign different small groups 2-3 questions
each. Allow them to record their reflections on the sheets of papers from
the large self-stick easel pad. Reflections can be words or drawings. At the
end, allow the small groups to stick their sheets of paper on a wall and
allow the students to move around to see their fellow participant’s
responses. Another option is to have each small group share their
reflections with the larger group.

  • What makes giving forgiveness difficult and what helps?
  • What makes receiving forgiveness difficult and what helps?
  • How might unforgiveness prevent someone from experiencing joy?
  • How do you think forgiveness and joy are connected?
  • What role do family, friends, and the wider-community play in
    forgiveness?
  • How can we build a community of forgiveness?

Send Forth

Send Forth (5 minutes)

  • Debrief 
    In this session, we focused on forgiveness. Through the story, the
    sculpture, and activities we discussed the role of God and the role of the
    community in being able to give and receive forgiveness. We also
    discovered that forgiveness, in Luke 5:17-26, led to joy that spread to
    others in the community. Let’s go around the room and each share a word
    or phrase that represents something you have learned or appreciated or
    an emotion you felt during our time together.
  • Pray Together 
    (a prayer of St Francis of Assisi, modified to be inclusive of a community
    with the words “us” and “let us bring”)

Lord, make us instruments of your peace; where there is hatred, let us
bring love; where there is injury let us bring pardon; where there is discord
let us bring union; where there is doubt let us bring faith; where there is
despair let us bring hope; where there is darkness let us bring light; and
where there is sadness let us bring joy.

Related Videos

Lecture

Interview Clips